amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, born 15 September 1977
12 Quotes
I think you travel to search and you come back home to find yourself there.
I have been writing since I was old enough to spell. I have never considered not writing.
The single story creates stereotypes, and the problem with stereotypes is not that they are untrue, but that they are incomplete. They make one story become the only story.
Of course I am not worried about intimidating men. The type of man who will be intimidated by me is exactly the type of man I have no interest in.
Racism should never have happened and so you don’t get a cookie for reducing it.
Stories have been used to dispossess and to malign. But stories can also be used to empower, and to humanize. Stories can break the dignity of a people. But stories can also repair that broken dignity.
If you don’t understand, ask questions. If you’re uncomfortable about asking questions, say you are uncomfortable about asking questions and then ask anyway.
Because of writers like Chinua Achebe and Camara Laye … I realized that people like me, girls with skin the colour of chocolate, whose kinky hair could not form ponytails, could also exist in literature.
You can’t write a script in your mind and then force yourself to follow it. You have to let yourself be.
The best novels are those that are important without being like medicine; they have something to say, are expansive and intelligent but never forget to be entertaining and to have character and emotion at their centre.
I write from real life. I am an unrepentant eavesdropper and a collector of stories. I record bits of overheard dialogue.
Our histories cling to us. We are shaped by where we come from.
Adichie is a Nigerian writer. Her best known novels are Purple Hibiscus, Half of a Yellow Sun, and Americanah.
Source for image
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, born 15 September 1977

12 Quotes

  1. I think you travel to search and you come back home to find yourself there.
  2. I have been writing since I was old enough to spell. I have never considered not writing.
  3. The single story creates stereotypes, and the problem with stereotypes is not that they are untrue, but that they are incomplete. They make one story become the only story.
  4. Of course I am not worried about intimidating men. The type of man who will be intimidated by me is exactly the type of man I have no interest in.
  5. Racism should never have happened and so you don’t get a cookie for reducing it.
  6. Stories have been used to dispossess and to malign. But stories can also be used to empower, and to humanize. Stories can break the dignity of a people. But stories can also repair that broken dignity.
  7. If you don’t understand, ask questions. If you’re uncomfortable about asking questions, say you are uncomfortable about asking questions and then ask anyway.
  8. Because of writers like Chinua Achebe and Camara Laye … I realized that people like me, girls with skin the colour of chocolate, whose kinky hair could not form ponytails, could also exist in literature.
  9. You can’t write a script in your mind and then force yourself to follow it. You have to let yourself be.
  10. The best novels are those that are important without being like medicine; they have something to say, are expansive and intelligent but never forget to be entertaining and to have character and emotion at their centre.
  11. I write from real life. I am an unrepentant eavesdropper and a collector of stories. I record bits of overheard dialogue.
  12. Our histories cling to us. We are shaped by where we come from.

Adichie is a Nigerian writer. Her best known novels are Purple Hibiscus, Half of a Yellow Sun, and Americanah.

Source for image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

In the midst of hate, I found there was, within me, an invincible love.
In the midst of tears, I found there was, within me, an invincible smile.
In the midst of chaos, I found there was, within me, an invincible calm. 
I realized, through it all, that 
In the middle of winter, I finally found that within me there lies an invincible summer.
- Albert Camus (via fy-perspectives)
Nearly every day, a friend or acquaintance tags me on Facebook, asking me to share a list of 10 books that have influenced me. Nearly every day, I read such lists from the same circle of friends and acquaintances. I understand the tidy pleasures provided by such an exercise, but in truth, I am not merely influenced by books. I could not limit a list of important books to a number or a neatly organized list. The list, whatever it might look like, would always be changing because I too am always changing. I am not influenced by books. Instead, I am shaped by them. I am made of flesh and bone and blood. I am also made of books.
- Read the rest of this essay The Books That Made Me Who I Am (via roxanegay)
“Emperor of Africa,” 2013. (Photograph copyright Samuel Fosso, courtesy the Walther Collection and Jean Marc Patras Galerie.) “Le rêve de mon grand-père,” 2003. (Photograph copyright Samuel Fosso, courtesy the Walther Collection and Jean Marc Patras Galerie.) “Self-Portraits from the 1970s,” 1977. (Photograph copyright Samuel Fosso, courtesy the Walther Collection and Jean Marc Patras Galerie.)

newyorker:

The photographer Samuel Fosso is widely considered one of Africa’s most important contemporary artists. Last February, amid catastrophic violence in the Central African Republic, Fosso’s studio was ransacked and much of his archive destroyed. Despite this, the Walther Collection in New York has managed to stage a solo exhibition of Fosso’s work.

All images copyright Samuel Fosso, courtesy the Walther Collection and Jean Marc Patras Galerie


there’s something charming, sometimes, about a bed that sits on the floor. i don’t know why, and i certainly don’t think that it’s inherently telling. but it often gives the impression that maybe a person doesn’t have their shit completely together. i like that. 

there’s something charming, sometimes, about a bed that sits on the floor. i don’t know why, and i certainly don’t think that it’s inherently telling. but it often gives the impression that maybe a person doesn’t have their shit completely together. i like that. 

(Source: rubyandmoon)